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Thursday, December 20, 2012

Triggers Of Holiday Over Indulgence




Source: Youtube, MojoTV.com

Monday, December 17, 2012

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Are You a Skinny Fat Person?



The common wisdom is that if you are overweight you are unhealthy, and if you are thin, you are healthy. But new research points to just how dangerous being skinny can be -- if you are a "skinny fat" person, that is.

The medical term for this is "MONW," or metabolically obese normal weight, which I prefer to refer to as being a skinny fat person. It means you are under lean but over fat -- not enough muscle and too much fat (especially belly fat). It seems it is better to be fat and fit than thin and out of shape.

While we know that 68 percent of the American population is overweight, and that most have diabesity -- being somewhere on the continuum of pre-diabetes to Type 2 diabetes -- the shocking news from a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association is that nearly 1 in 4 skinny people have pre-diabetes and are "metabolically obese."

What's worse is that if you are a skinny fat person and get diagnosed with diabetes, you have twice the risk of death than if you are overweight when diagnosed with diabetes. Perhaps having that extra muscle on your body from having to carry around those extra pounds protects you.

Studies on teenagers found that 37 percent of the skinny kids had one or more signs of pre-diabetes such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar, or high cholesterol. Wait -- almost four out of 10 normal-weight kids are pre-diabetic?

It is bad enough that one-third of kids are overweight or obese in America, but now it appears that only about 20 percent of children in America are healthy. In other words, 8 out of 10 children in America are overweight or have pre-diabetes or Type 2 diabetes.

In my medical practice I see this all the time. Jim came in for a "wellness check up" and felt happy about his weight. His BMI (or body mass index) was 22 (normal is 18 to 24.)

He never seemed to gain weight and felt he could "tolerate" a diet that included lots of bread, pasta, and sugar. He liked his two sodas a day and a few glasses of wine at night. He walked but didn't do much vigorous exercise or weight training.

When we looked under the hood we found he had a blood sugar of 117 mg/dl (pre-diabetes), triglycerides of 350 mg/dl, and an HDL of 35 mg/dl. His blood pressure was 148/96 mmHg (normal is less than 110/75 mmHg).

And when we measured his insulin levels after taking a sugar drink, they were sky high. Insulin is the real culprit here -- it is the fat storage hormone. It stores belly fat and leads to hormonal and metabolic changes that cause muscle loss and inflammation, furthering the vicious cycle of pre-diabetes or Type 2 diabetes -- whether you are skinny or fat.

He was shocked to find out he had severe pre-diabetes and was a ticking time bomb for a heart attack, stroke, and even cancer and dementia. I treated Jim exactly the same way as my patients with Type 2 diabetes.

Get the Right Tests

So how do you know if you are a skinny fat person? There are a few criteria you can use that can help you identify yourself as having diabesity or being "skinny fat," including family history of Type 2 diabetes or early onset of heart disease (heart attack in relative under 50 years old), or even looking down and see a little pot belly. And if you are of Asian or Indian descent, you can get diabesity at a much lower body weight.

There are some important blood tests that you should have your doctor do:

    Fasting blood sugar or glucose (normal less than 90 mg/dl)
    Triglycerides (normal less than 100 mg/dl)
    HDL (good cholesterol (normal greater than 60 mg/dl)
    Blood pressure (normal less than 120/80, ideal less than 115/75)


But there are a few special tests your doctor may not do that you should insist on that tell the true story and help to detect diabesity much earlier. They are:

1. An insulin response test (what most doctors call a glucose tolerance test but with the addition of insulin measurements) that will:

    Measure glucose (blood sugar) AND insulin levels while fasting and one and two hours after a 75-gram glucose drink (the equivalent of two sodas).

    Glucose should be less than 90 mg/dl fasting and never go above 120 mg/dl at one and two hours. Over 140 mg/dl is pre-diabetes, and over 200 mg/dl is Type 2 diabetes.

    Insulin should be less than 10 fasting and never go above 25 or 30 after the sugar drink. Many with diabesity and skinny fat people can have levels over 50, 100, or even 200.


2. NMR Lipid Particle Test (by LipoScience performed by LabCorp)

    This measures the size and number of cholesterol particles. You should have fewer than 1,000 total

    LDL particles and fewer than 500 small LDL particles.

    Most cholesterol tests just measure the total amount, like 200 mg/dl, but the particle test is MUCH better at predicting risk for heart disease.

    When you are a skinny fat person with diabesity you have too many particles, and they are the small, dense, dangerous kind.


The Cure for the Skinny Fat Syndrome

The cure for the skinny fat syndrome is the same as the cure for someone who is overweight with diabesity. It is the subject of my latest book, The Blood Sugar Solution.

It is quite simple actually.

    Eat a Low-Glycemic Load Diet -- Lean animal protein (chicken, fish, and eggs), nuts, seeds, beans, vegetables, fruit, and small amounts of non-gluten grains.

    Power Up with Protein -- Start the day with protein and at each meal. This makes your metabolism run hotter and cuts hunger. Incorporate eggs, protein shakes, nuts, seeds, chicken, or fish.

    Don't Drink Your Calories -- No sodas, juices, sweetened drinks and no more than 3-4 glasses of wine or alcohol a week with meals.

    Avoid the Deadly White Powder or Flour -- Including gluten-free flour products. Even whole grain flour acts like sugar in your body.

    Beware of Frankenfood -- Factory-made foods are often science projects with fake ingredients including MSG (which causes ravenous hunger and is hidden as "natural flavoring"), high fructose corn syrup, artificial colors, preservatives, and chemicals.

    Eat From the Right Plant -- If it was made in a plant stay away, if it was grown on a plant it is probably okay.

    Get an Oil Change -- Eat omega-3 fat-rich foods including sardines and wild salmon and avoid refined and processed vegetable oils except olive oil.

    Get Going and Get Strong -- Both cardio and strength training are key. Cardio builds fitness and improves metabolism, and strength training builds muscle so you won't be a skinny fat person.

    Take Supplements -- They grease the wheels of your metabolism and help burn calories and balance blood sugar. A good multivitamin, fish oil (EPA/DHA,) and vitamin D do the trick for 95 percent of people.

    Protect Sleep Time -- Sleep deprivation alters metabolism and increases cravings for carbs and sugar. Sleep is sacred. Make your bedroom a sleeping temple and stay there for 7 to 8 hours a night.


These latest facts are alarming because those of us who think we get a pass because we are thin need to take a second look at our health. You can still be skinny and sick and be metabolically obese, which in the end may be even more dangerous.

The good news is that this is a solvable problem. Getting tested and working through the 10 steps to being a skinny healthy person is a scientifically proven, effective way to change your biology quickly. And the side effects are all good: increased energy, better sleep and even better sex! For more information on how to reverse diabesity see The Blood Sugar Solution to get a free sneak peak.


References:

Carnethon MR, De Chavez PJ, Biggs ML, Lewis CE, Pankow JS, Bertoni AG, Golden SH, Liu K, Mukamal KJ, Campbell-Jenkins B, Dyer AR. Association of weight status with mortality in adults with incident diabetes. JAMA. 2012 Aug 8;308(6):581-90.

Ribeiro JP, Schaan BD. Physical activity advice only or structured exercise training and association with HbA1c levels in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA. 2011 May 4;305(17):1790-9. Review.

Mark Hyman, M.D. is a practicing physician, founder of The UltraWellness Center, a four-time New York Times bestselling author, and an international leader in the field of Functional Medicine. You can follow him on Twitter, connect with him on LinkedIn, watch his videos on YouTube, become a fan on Facebook, and subscribe to his newsletter.

Monday, December 10, 2012

Digestive Enzymes 101




Enzymes needed for digestion will cause problems when deficient.

Most of us have experienced the occasional upset stomach gas and bloating, but what if this were a daily problem. If you struggle with poor digestive health; symptoms like gas, bloating, fatigue, constipation, and other digestive system problems, you may be deficient in enzymes needed for digestion.


Holistic digestion and the enzymes needed for digestion


enzymes needed for digestion Holistic digestion requires a coordination of enzyme secretion, muscle contraction, and nutrient absorption. Without the proper enzymes or enough enzymes to breakdown your food, you will have less than optimal digestion resulting in:
* Fatigue
* Constipation
* Gas and bloating
* Acid reflux
Enzyme activity starts in your mouth as you chew your food and it mixes with your saliva. The saliva has enzymes in it and begins to breakdown the food.
So what do you think happens when you don't chew your food properly...?
That's right, it leaves more work to the mechanics and enzymes of the stomach. As the food passes into your stomach the cells in the stomach secrete hydrocloric acid or HCL. This acidic substance is important because it activates enzymes needed for digestion of proteins. In the absence of HCL these enzymes sit inactive. Pepsin and other proteases are the main enzymes used in the stomach to breakdown proteins into their smaller counterparts amino acids and peptides.

The enzyme activity in the stomach do a primitive job of breaking down big food particles into smaller ones and this is needed in order for the small intestine to perform its job. Once these smaller food particles enter the small intestine, new enzymes are activated and focus further on breaking down smaller and smaller particles. Lipases breakdown fats, more proteases for proteins, and other specific enzymes to breakdown starches and lignans.


Ever feel like the food you eat is sitting there and not moving?


Based on the above what do you think could be going on with your digestion to cause this?


You guessed it.... Inadequate enzyme activity. This is the most common reason to have the above mentioned symptoms but there are natural health solutions to resolve these symptoms. One key component is identifying the enzymes needed for digestion that are inadequate and supplementing them. To much and you can make the issue worse, too little and they won't be effective.

Source:  PsycheTruth, discoverholistichealth.org

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Pounds vs. Inches







Your body composition is another assessment tool you can use to determine the state of your health. Like the body mass index, or BMI, your body fat composition is an estimate. You are likely to see the physical manifestation of your body fat on your waistline. Abdominal fat is especially dangerous from a health perspective. It puts added pressure on your heart because of weight gain and increases your risk for heart disease and diabetes.

Body Fat Composition

Online health sites, such as Health Central, provide calculators for estimating your pounds of body fat. You will need to know your current weight and height as well as measurements for your hips, calves, thighs and wrists. The calculator will give you the percent of body fat. Take this figure and multiply it by your weight. For example, if you are 160 pounds with 10 percent body fat, your pounds of fat will be 16 pounds, with 144 pounds of lean body mass. The normal range for women is between 10 percent and 31 percent, with 21 percent to 24 percent indicating a person in good physical fitness, according to the American Council on Exercise.





Source: Tiffany Wright, MD, LiveStrong.com

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Wheat The Truth



Is wheat healthy? Wheat gets picked on a lot these days, as a common allergen and as the demonized white flour. But are these concerns justified? What about whole wheat, seitan (made with wheat gluten), and sprouted wheat?


Source:  Youtube, healthyeatingstartshere.com

Friday, November 23, 2012

Got That Tingling Feeling?



Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which there is pressure on the median nerve -- the nerve in the wrist that supplies feeling and movement to parts of the hand. It can lead to numbness, tingling, weakness, or muscle damage in the hand and fingers.


Causes, incidence, and risk factors

The median nerve provides feeling and movement to the "thumb side" of the hand (the palm, thumb, index finger, middle finger, and thumb side of the ring finger).
The area in your wrist where the nerve enters the hand is called the carpal tunnel. This tunnel is normally narrow, so any swelling can pinch the nerve and cause pain, numbness, tingling or weakness. This is called carpal tunnel syndrome.
Carpal tunnel syndrome is common in people who perform repetitive motions of the hand and wrist. Typing on a computer keyboard is probably the most common cause of carpal tunnel. Other causes include:
  • Driving
  • Painting
  • Playing some musical instruments
  • Playing sports such as racquetball or handball
  • Sewing
  • Using tools (especially hand tools or tools that vibrate)
  • Working on an assembly line
  • Writing
The condition occurs most often in people 30 to 60 years old, and is more common in women than men.
A number of medical problems are associated with carpal tunnel syndrome, including:

Symptoms

  • Clumsiness of the hand when gripping objects
  • Numbness or tingling in the thumb and next two or three fingers of one or both hands
  • Numbness or tingling of the palm of the hand
  • Pain extending to the elbow
  • Pain in the wrist or hand in one or both hands
  • Problems with fine finger movements (coordination) in one or both hands
  • Wasting away of the muscle under the thumb (in advanced or long-term cases)
  • Weak grip or difficulty carrying bags (a common complaint)
  • Weakness in one or both hands

Signs and tests

During a physical examination, the health care provider may find:
  • Numbness in the palm, thumb, index finger, middle finger, and thumb side of the ring finger
  • Weak hand grip
  • Tapping over the median nerve at the wrist may cause pain to shoot from the wrist to the hand (this is called Tinel's sign)
  • Bending the wrist forward all the way for 60 seconds will usually result in numbness, tingling, or weakness (this is called Phalen's test)
Tests may include:

Treatment

You may try wearing a splint at night for several weeks. If this does not help, you may need to try wearing the splint during the day. Avoid sleeping on your wrists. Hot and cold compresses may also be recommended.
There are many changes you can make in the workplace to reduce the stress on your wrist:
  • Special devices include keyboards, different types of computer mouse, cushioned mouse pads, and keyboard drawers.
  • Someone should review the position you are in when performing your work activities. For example, make sure the keyboard is low enough so that your wrists aren't bent upward while typing. Your health care provider may suggest an occupational therapist.
  • You may also need to make changes in your work duties or recreational activities. Some of the jobs associated with carpal tunnel syndrome include those that involve typing and vibrating tools. Carpal tunnel syndrome has also been linked to professional musicians.
MEDICATIONS
Medications used in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen or naproxen. Corticosteroid injections, given into the carpal tunnel area, may relieve symptoms for a period of time.
SURGERY
Carpal tunnel release is a surgical procedure that cuts into the ligament that is pressing on the nerve. Surgery is successful most of the time, but it depends on how long the nerve compression has been occurring and its severity.
See also: Carpal tunnel release

Expectations (prognosis)

Symptoms often improve with treatment, but more than 50% of cases eventually require surgery. Surgery is often successful, but full healing can take months.

Complications

If the condition is treated properly, there are usually no complications. If untreated, the nerve can be damaged, causing permanent weakness, numbness, and tingling.

Calling your health care provider

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if:
  • You have symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Your symptoms do not respond to regular treatment, such as rest and anti-inflammatory medications, or if there seems to be a loss of muscle in your fingers

Prevention

Avoid or reduce the number of repetitive wrist movements whenever possible. Use tools and equipment that are properly designed to reduce the risk of wrist injury.
Ergonomic aids, such as split keyboards, keyboard trays, typing pads, and wrist braces, may be used to improve wrist posture during typing. Take frequent breaks when typing and always stop if there is tingling or pain.


Source: Chad Madden, Physical Therapist, PubMed Health
  1. Huisstede Bm, Hoogvliet P, Randsdorp MS, Glerum S, van Middlekoop M, Koes BW. Carpal tunnel syndrome. Part I: effectiveness of nonsurgical treatments--a systematic review. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010;91:981-1004.
  2. Huisstede BM, Randsdorp MS, Coert Jh, Glerum S, van Middlekoop M, Koes BW. Carpal tunnel syndrome. Part II: effectiveness of surgical treatments--a systematic review. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010;91:1005-1024.
  3. Keith MW. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2009;91(10):2478-2479.
  4. Keith MW. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons clinical practice guidelines on the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2010;92(1):218-219.

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

GMO & You (Genetically Modified Foods)



What is GMO?  (Genetically Modified Foods)

A genetically modified organism (GMO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. Organisms that have been genetically modified include micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeast, plants, fish, and mammals. GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods, and are also widely used in scientific research and to produce goods other than food. The term GMO is very close to the technical legal term, 'living modified organism' defined in the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, which regulates international trade in living GMOs (specifically, "any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology").

Source: PhyscheTruth, Youtube, Wikipedia

Monday, November 19, 2012

The American Obesity Epidemic






One in four Canadian adults is considered obese, a dramatic increase over the past 25 years, Statistics Canada reports. According to results for the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey, which measured most of the 35,000 respondents' height and weight, 23 per cent of all adults are obese, representing 5.5 million people.
The study is considered Canada's most accurate measurement of waistlines.
The study is considered Canada's most accurate measurement of waistlines.

In 1978-79, the last time a survey of this type was taken, 14 per cent of adults were obese. Obesity rates were calculated using the body mass index (BMI) by dividing weight in kilograms by height in metres squared. A normal BMI rate is in the 18.5 to 24.9 range while someone who records a BMI over 30 is considered obese.
Among adults, those aged 25 to 34 and 75 or older recorded the biggest increase, nearly doubling their obesity rates to 21 per cent and 24 per cent respectively.
Dr. Gregory Taylor
Dr. Gregory Taylor

Three per cent of children aged two to 17 were obese 25 years ago. That rate shot up to eight per cent in 2004. The biggest increases in obesity rates in young people occurred among those aged 12 to 17, where the rate tripled from three per cent to nine per cent.
"Obese and overweight children tend to be obese and overweight adults and they'll be experiencing the risks of that for their entire lifetime," said Dr. Gregory Taylor of the Public Health Agency of Canada in Canada.

The health risks of excess weight include type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, some cancers and gallbladder disease that put more pressure on Canada's health-care system.
Promoting healthy habits
To help reverse the trend, nutritionists at the University of Alberta have designed a hospital-based program to help children eat better, exercise more and learn about their health.
"Children are still developing those lifestyle behaviours that may lead to overweight," said Geoff Ball, a pediatrics professor. By targeting them at an earlier age, doctors and parents have a chance of steering children to a healthier track, he said.
Provincially, men's rates were significantly above the national level in Newfoundland and Labrador (33 per cent) and Manitoba (30 per cent). Women's rates surpassed the national figure in Newfoundland and Labrador (35 per cent), Nova Scotia (30 per cent) and Saskatchewan (33 per cent).
But Canada's adult obesity rate was significantly lower than the U.S. While 23 per cent of Canadian adults were obese in 2004, the rate was nearly 30 per cent south of the border.
The researchers also found men and women who ate fruit and vegetables less than three times a day were more likely to be obese than were those who consumed those foods five or more times a day.
People who were sedentary were more likely than those who were physically active to be obese. For example, 27 per cent of sedentary men were obese, compared with 19.6 per cent of active men.

Source: Youtube, Aljazeera, CBC

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Boost Your B's!




Source: Dr. Vic Shayne, Nutrition Research Center

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Tennis Elbow Exercises




Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)


Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause this condition. But several other sports and activities can also put you at risk.
Tennis elbow is an inflammation of the tendons that join the forearm muscles on the outside of the elbow. The forearm muscles and tendons become damaged from overuse — repeating the same motions again and again. This leads to pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow.
There are many treatment options for tennis elbow. In most cases, treatment involves a team approach. Primary doctors, physical therapists, and, in some cases, surgeons work together to provide the most effective care.


Source: Dr. Kahl Goldfarb, D.P.T., C.S.C.S., American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

500 Rep Challenge




Source: Open Sky Fitness, Youtube

Monday, November 5, 2012

What is Type 1 Diabetes?




Source: Heidi Kaufman, Nutritionist

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Monday, October 15, 2012

100 Awesome Body By Vi Shake Recipes!



Wondering how you could stay happy and content with a shake for breakfast, and one for lunch?
With 100 Body By Vi Shake recipes, you can drink a shake per day for over 90 days and never drink the same shake twice!!

Any kind of Milk can be used in these shakes.  We recommend Unsweetened Blue Diamond Almond Breeze.  Also, we also recommend using non-diet products.  It is better to consume real sugar as opposed to ingesting altered sugars.  Altered sugars actually CAUSE weight gain!!!  Enjoy!

After Glow Smoothie: 4 oz. (1/2 cup) pomegranate juice, 4 oz. (1/2 cup orange juice), 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen pineapple & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

All Berry Delight: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape Vishake mix, 1/4 cup frozen raspberries, 1/4 cup frozen blackberries, 1/4 cup frozen strawberries, ¼ cup frozen dark cherries & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Almond Joy: 8 oz. Silk Pure Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 tsp coconut extract, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder) & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Amaretto: 8 oz. Silk Pure Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape Vi-Shake mix, 1 cup frozen dark sweet cherries & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Ambrosia: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ tsp. coconut extract, ¼ cup pear slices, ¼ apple slices, ¼ cup frozen strawberries, ¼ cup frozen pineapple chunks, 1 peach flavor packet & 3 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Angel Food Cake: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape Body By Vi Shake mix, ½ tsp. coconut extract, ½ tsp. vanilla extract & 3 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Apple Cider Smoothie: 6 oz. unsweetened apple juice (or cider), 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 orange flavor packet, 2 tsp. cinnamon, 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Apple Mango Freeze: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 3 Tbsp. unsweetened apple sauce, 1 cup frozen mango chunks & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Apple Pie: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape bodybyvi shake mix, 3 Tbsp. unsweetened apple sauce, 2 tsp. cinnamon, 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Banana Coconut Breeze: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 small frozen banana, 1 banana flavor packet, ½ tsp. coconut extract, & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Banana Kiwi Cooler: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 small frozen banana, 1 banana flavor packet, ½ cup fresh kiwi slices (peeled), & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Banana Cream: 8 oz. water, ¾ cup vanilla low fat yogurt, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 small banana (6” inches), 1 tsp. vanilla extract, & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Banana Nut Bread: 8 oz. Silk Pure Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 tsp. butter extract flavoring, 1 banana flavor packet, 1 tsp. cinnamon, ½ tsp. vanilla extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Banana Spice: 8 oz. Silk Light Vanilla Soy Milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape body by vi shake mix, 1 small frozen banana (6” inches), 2 Tbsp. ground flax seeds, pinch of cinnamon, pinch of nutmeg & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Banana Split: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 small banana (6” inches), 1 Chocolate flavor packet, 1 Tbsp. reduced fat peanut butter, & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Berry Blast: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ cup frozen blackberries, ½ cup frozen strawberries & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Berry Peachy: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape bodybyvi shake mix, ½ cup frozen peach slices, ½ cup frozen strawberries, 1 peach flavor packet & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Berries & Cream: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ cup frozen raspberries, ½ cup frozen strawberries, 1 strawberry flavor packet, ½ tsp. vanilla extract & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Birthday Cake: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 chocolate flavor packet, ½ tsp. butter flavoring (or butter buds), ½ tsp. vanilla extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blackberry Apple Slush: 6 oz. unsweetened apple juice, 2 scoops Vi-Shape vi-shake mix, 30 frozen blackberries & 7 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blackberry Freeze: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 30 frozen blackberries & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blackberry Pie: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen blackberries, 1 Tbsp. Graham Cracker Crumbs, 1 tsp. vanilla extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Black Raspberry Vanilla Cooler: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 15 frozen blackberries, 15 frozen raspberries, 1 tsp. vanilla extract & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blended Coffee: 8 oz. (1 cup) coffee-instant, regular, prepared with water, 1 ½ cup skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 chocolate flavor packet & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Blaster: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 30 frozen blueberries & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Cheesecake: 6 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape vishake mix, 20 frozen blueberries, 1 tsp. graham cracker crumbs, 2 oz. fat-free cream cheese & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Lemon Freeze: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen blueberries, 1 Tbsp. sugar-free instant lemon pudding mix, & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Mango Smoothie: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen blueberries, ½ cup frozen mango chunks, & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Peach Cobbler: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 15 frozen blueberries, 1 cup frozen peach slices, 1 tsp. vanilla extract & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Pie: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen blueberries, 2 Tbsp. Graham Cracker Crumbs, 1 tsp. vanilla extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Pomegranate: 6 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen blueberries, ½ cup pomegranate juice & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blueberry Vanilla Pear: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ cup frozen blueberries, ½ pear (chopped) & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Blue Banana: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 15 frozen blueberries, 1 banana flavor packet (or 1/2 frozen banana), & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Butterfinger: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 2 Tbsp. sugar free butterscotch pudding mix, 1 Tbsp. reduced-fat peanut butter & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Butterscotch Mousse: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 2 Tbsp. sugar free butterscotch pudding mix & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Café Latte: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 tsp. dry instant coffee powder & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Candy Cane: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ cup frozen strawberries, ½ tsp. peppermint extract, 1 strawberry flavor pack & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Caramello: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 2 tsp. sugar free caramel flavoring & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Almond Chill: 8 oz. Silk Pure Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen dark sweet cherries & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Banana Breeze: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen dark sweet cherries, 1 banana flavor packet & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Cheesecake: 6 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen dark unsweetened cherries, 2 oz. fat-free cream cheese, 2 dashes ground cinnamon & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Lemonade: 6 oz. crystal light lemonade, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen dark sweet cherries & 8 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Orange Delight: 4 oz. orange juice, 4 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen dark sweet cherries & 8 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Pineapple Slush: 6 oz. water, 2 oz. pineapple juice drained from can, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 cup pineapple, ½ cup frozen cherries & 8 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Limeade: 8 oz. vanilla soy milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 Tbsp. frozen limeade concentrate, 4 maraschino cherries & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Pineapple Chill: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 cup frozen dark sweet cherries, ½ cup frozen pineapple chunks, & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cherry Spice: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen dark sweet cherries, 2 tsp. cinnamon & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Chocolate Almond Delight: 12 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 15 raw almonds, ½ tsp. coconut extract, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Chocolate Cheesecake: 6 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), 2 oz. fat-free cream cheese & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Chocolate Covered Cherries: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 10 frozen dark sweet cherries, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Chocolate Covered Strawberries: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 5 frozen strawberries, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Cup: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 Tbsp. reduced fat peanut butter, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Chocolate Peppermint: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 tsp. peppermint extract, 2 chocolate flavor packets (or 2 Tbsp. cocoa powder), & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender. For a hot chocolate treat, heat in microwave.

Chocolate Razzleberry: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/3 cup frozen raspberries, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cinnaberry: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 5 frozen strawberries, 1 strawberry flavor packet, 3 tsp. cinnamon & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cinnamon Almond Cream: 8 oz. Silk Pure Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 3 tsp. cinnamon & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cinnamon Bun: 8 oz. vanilla soy milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 2 Tbsp. cinnamon, 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract, 1 tsp. butter buds (or butter flavoring) & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Citrus Berry: 4 oz. Almond milk, 4 oz. orange juice, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 strawberry flavor packet, ½ cup frozen strawberries, 1 tsp. lemon juice & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Citrus Spice: 6 oz. orange juice, 2 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 Tbsp. lemon juice , 3 tsp. cinnamon & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Citrus Splash: 6 oz. sprite zero or diet sprite, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 orange flavor packet, 1/2 Tbsp. lemon juice, ½ Tbsp. lime juice, & 7 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Citrus Delight: 4 oz. water, 2 oz. orange juice, 2 oz. grapefruit juice, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 orange flavor packet, 1 tsp. lemon juice & 7 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Coco Mango: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 6 chunks frozen mango (1 cup), ½ tsp. coconut extract & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Coconut Lime Spritzer: 6 oz. sprite zero or diet sprite, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 2 Tbsp. lime juice, ½ tsp. coconut extract & 7 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Cranberry Crush: 8 oz. (1 cup) cranberry juice (no sugar added), 2 scoops shake mix, 4 frozen strawberries, 2 Tbsp. plain nonfat yogurt & 6 ice cubes.

Cranberry Citrus Splash: 4 oz. (1/2 cup) cranberry juice (no sugar added), 4 oz. orange juice (1/2 cup), 2 scoops shake mix, 1 orange flavor packet, 2 Tbsp. plain nonfat yogurt & 6 ice cubes.

Cran-Blueberry: 4 oz. (1/2 cup) cranberry juice (no sugar added), 4 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops shake mix, 1 cup frozen blueberries & 5 ice cubes.

Dreamsicle: 8 oz. Vanilla Almond milk, 2 scoops shake mix, 1 Tbsp. orange juice concentrate or 3 Tbsp. orange juice, & 6 ice cubes.

Frozen Banana: 8 oz. Vanilla Almond milk, 2 scoops shake mix, 1 small frozen banana, 1 chocolate flavor packet & 6 ice cubes.

Fruit Bar: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops shake mix, 1 strawberry flavor packet, 1 cup frozen raspberries, ½ tsp. coconut extract & 5 ice cubes.

Fruit Loop: 8 oz. water, 4 scoops shake mix, 1 strawberry flavor packet, 1 orange flavor packet & 5 ice cubes.

Fruit Smoothie: 4 oz. water, 2 scoops shake mix, ½ small banana 6”, 6 frozen strawberries, ½ cup frozen pineapple & 5 ice cubes.

Fuzzy Navel: 4 oz. skim milk, 4 oz. reduced calorie orange juice, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup peach slices (frozen or canned) & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

German Chocolate Cake: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 chocolate flavor packet, 1 tsp. coconut extract, & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Hawaiian Apple: 2 oz. unsweetened apple juice, 4 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ cup unsweetened apple juice, 1/2 tsp. coconut extract & 8 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Holiday Shake: 4 oz. skim milk, 4 oz. egg nog, ½ tsp. rum extract (optional), 1/8 tsp. cinnamon, 1/8 tsp. nutmeg, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Honeydew Melon Dream: 4 oz. water, ¼ cup non-fat vanilla yogurt, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup (5 large chunks) honeydew melon & 4 ice cubes. Blend ice & water in blender first, then add shake mix & honeydew melon & blend.

Key Lime Pie: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 3 tsp. limeade concentrate, 3 tsp. graham cracker crumbs, & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Kiwi Melon Freeze: 4 oz. water, ¼ cup non-fat vanilla yogurt, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 cup (3 large chunks) honeydew melon, 1 kiwi (peeled & cut-up) & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Lemon Fizz: 6 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 30 frozen raspberries, 1 Neuro lemon packet & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Lemon Mango: 4 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen mango, 1 6 oz. fat free lemon yogurt, & 3 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Lemon Meringue: 8 oz. skim milk, ¼ cup Simply Natural limeade, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 tsp. sugar free lemon pudding mix & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Limeade: 8 oz. vanilla soy milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 Tbsp. frozen limeade concentrate & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Mango Peach: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 6 chunks frozen mango, 3 slices frozen peaches, 1 peach flavor packet (or 3 additional frozen peaches), & 3 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Monkey Shake: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 small banana (6” inches), 1 Chocolate flavor packet, & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Neapolitan: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), 1 strawberry flavor packet (or 4 frozen strawberries), 1 tsp. vanilla extract & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Orange Pomegranate: 8 oz. orange juice, 4 oz. pomegranate juice, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Papaya Mango Chiller: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 2 slices papaya, 1 cup frozen mango & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Peach Cooler: 8 oz. Diet 7-up, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup peach slices (frozen), 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Peach Melon Slush: 6 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 4 large chunks frozen watermelon, 1 peach flavor packet & 8 ice cubes. Blend ice & water in blender first, then add shake mix & watermelon & blend.

Peach Dream: 8 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ¾ cup low fat vanilla yogurt, 1 cup peach slices (frozen or canned), 1 tsp. vanilla extract & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Peach Raspberry Blast: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen raspberries, 1 peach flavor packet & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Peanut Butter & Jelly: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 Tbsp. reduced fat peanut butter, 1 Tbsp. sugar free preserves/jelly & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Pear Berry Blizzard: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup sliced pears, 1 strawberry flavor packet & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Pear Glace Cooler: 6 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup sliced pears, 3 chunks frozen watermelon, 1 peach flavor packet & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Pina Colada: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 5 large chunks frozen pineapple, 1/2 tsp. coconut extract, & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Pineapple Crush: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 6 chunks frozen pineapple (1/2 cup) & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Pineapple Mango Tango: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ cup frozen pineapple, ½ cup frozen mango chunks & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Pineapple Upside Down Cake: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ tsp. butter flavoring (or butter buds), ½ tsp. vanilla extract, ½ cup frozen pineapple, ¼ cup frozen dark sweet cherries & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Plum Cooler: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 plum (pitted), juice of 1 lemon & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Pumpkin Spice: 8 oz. skim milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/3 cup canned pumpkin (without salt), 1/8 tsp. vanilla extract, 1/8 tsp. cinnamon, 1/8 tsp. nutmeg & 2 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Purple Cow: 8 oz. Almond milk, 1 Tbsp. frozen grape juice concentrate, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 banana flavor packet (or 1/2 banana) & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Raspberry Freeze: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 30 frozen raspberries & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Raspberry Fizz: 6 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 30 frozen raspberries, 1 Neuro raspberry flavor packet & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Raspberry Mint Chocolate: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 30 frozen raspberries, ½ tsp. peppermint extract, 1 chocolate flavor pack (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder) & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Red, White & Blue: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen blueberries, 1 cup frozen strawberries, 1 strawberry flavor packet. Blend well in blender.

Root Beer Float: 4 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix…mix together in blender first. Add ½ cup ice. Add ½ can diet mug root beer (to taste) and pulse a few time to mix in.

Sex on the Beach: 4 oz. cranberry juice (no sugar added), 4 oz. reduced calorie orange juice, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup pineapple (frozen or canned) & 8 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Snickerdoodle: 8 oz. light vanilla soy milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 tsp. cinnamon, 1 Tbsp. Honey & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Spiced Cranberry: 8 oz. cranberry juice (no sugar added), 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 tsp. cinnamon & 8 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Spiced Peaches: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 peach flavor packet, ½ cup frozen peaches, 1 tsp. cinnamon & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Silky Latte: 4 oz. mocha soy milk (Silk Brand), 4 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix & 3 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Almond: 8 oz. Silk Pure Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 strawberry flavor packet, ½ cup frozen strawberries & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Banana: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 2/3 cup frozen strawberries, 1 banana flavor packet & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Blast: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen strawberries & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Coco: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen strawberries (or 1 strawberry flavor packet), ½ tsp. coconut extract & 3 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Cheesecake: 6 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 strawberry flavor packet (or 4 frozen strawberries), 2 oz. fat-free cream cheese & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Mango Dream: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ cup frozen mango, ½ cup frozen strawberries & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Melon Slush: 6 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 5 large chunks frozen watermelon, 1 strawberry flavor packet. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Pina Colada: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 4 large chunks frozen pineapple, 4 frozen strawberries, 1/2 tsp. coconut extract, & 3 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Strawberry Shortcake: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 strawberry flavor packet, ½ tsp. butter flavoring (or butter buds), ½ tsp. vanilla extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Summer Slim: 8 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, ½ peach or 6 frozen peach slices, 6 fresh or frozen strawberries & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Thai Coconut Chiller: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 Tbsp. lemon juice, ½ tsp. coconut extract & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Triple Chocolate Smash: 8 oz. Silk Light Chocolate Soy Milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder), 1 Tbsp. fat-free sugar-free chocolate pudding mix & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Tropical Delight: 4 oz. Almond milk, ½ cup reduced calorie orange juice (or 1 Tbsp. orange juice concentrate), 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen mango chunks, ½ tsp. coconut extract & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Tropical Dream: 8 oz. Vanilla Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 cup frozen pineapple, 1 chocolate flavor packet (or 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder) & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Tropical Teaser: 8 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1/2 cup frozen strawberries, 1 cup sliced mango, ½ cup frozen pineapple & 4 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Turtle Cheesecake: 6 oz. Almond milk, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 tsp. sugar free caramel flavoring, 2 oz. fat-free cream cheese, 3 pecans & 5 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Very Berry: 8 oz. sparkling water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 10 frozen raspberries, 6 frozen strawberries, & 2 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.

Watermelon Slush: 6 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 5 large chunks fresh watermelon & 8 ice cubes. Blend ice & water in blender first, then add shake mix & watermelon & blend.

Wild Berry Blast:8 oz. water, 2 scoops Vi-Shape shake mix, 8 frozen raspberries, 4 frozen strawberries, 15 frozen blueberries & 6 ice cubes. Blend well in blender.


HOT DRINKS ~

Creamy Vi-Chai: 8 oz skim milk, 1 scoop Vi-Shape shake mix, 1 TB Chai Mix (any kind).  Heat milk on stove, pour into blender with the powder and blend for a few seconds. Pour into coffee mugs.  I only used one scoop of Vi-Shape Shake Mix as this is just a nice warm morning drink.

Are you ready to take control of your life?  Join the 90 Day Challenge and along with the amazing products,great support and all these wonderful and yummy recipes you will have the world in your hands!!



Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Why Use Protein Powder?



uskdmmainc.bodybyvi.com

Protein powder supplements are popular supplements for strength-training athletes, bodybuilders and other active individuals, but they can be useful for anyone. The supplements are high in protein and tend to be low in carbohydrates and fat, which can make them appropriate for a range of dietary needs. While protein supplements may promote health benefits, check the labels closely, as nutrition facts vary among brands. Consult a doctor before using any supplement.


Improve Satiety

Protein powder can be a convenient alternative to other high-protein foods such as meat and fish, as those take longer to prepare. Another benefit protein powder provides compared to such foods is that may be a better way to control your appetite. A study from the October 2010 edition of "The British Journal of Nutrition" found that consuming whey protein provided more satiety than turkey, eggs and fish, and resulted in reduced calorie intake later in the day.

Although consuming protein shakes after workouts is popular, drinking your protein powder before you exercise may help you lose weight. A study published in the May 2010 issue of "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise" found that drinking whey protein before a workout resulted in an increased rate of calorie burning for the entire day following the workout.


Improved Future Performance

One way in which protein powder can be helpful is that it promotes recovery from your workouts. Resistance training puts stress on your body, and you may feel weaker in future workouts if you do not provide your body with the proper nutrients for recovery. Research from the May 2011 issue of the "Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research" suggests that consuming a shake made of protein and carbohydrates after workouts can help you maintain a high-level of performance in future training sessions.


Increased Muscle Size

Whether you're a professional bodybuilder or just an active individual trying to look and feel healthy, increasing your muscle size can be beneficial. While resistance training provides a stimulus for muscle growth, protein is required to increase size. Research from the June 2010 issue of "Nutrition & Metabolism" suggests that whey protein powder is more effective than other types of protein for increasing muscle size when combined with weight training.


References


    "The British Journal of Nutrition"; The Acute Effects of Four Protein Meals on Insulin, Glucose, Appetite and Energy Intake in Lean Men; S. Pal, V. Ellis; October 2010
    "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise"; Timing Protein Intake Increases Energy Expenditure 24 H After Resistance Training; K.J. Hackney, A.J. Bruenger, J.T. Lemmer; May 2010
    "Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research"; Postexercise Carbohydrate-Protein Supplementation Improves Subsequent Exercise Performance and Intracellular Signaling for Protein Synthesis; L. Ferguson-Stegall et al.; May 2011
    "Nutrition & Metabolism"; Effect of Protein/Essential Amino Acids and Resistance Training on Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy: A Case for Whey Protein; J.J. Hulmi, C.M. Lockwood, J.R. Stout; June 2010


Source: Livestrong.com


Monday, October 8, 2012

Drinking Diet Soda Makes You Fat!






Contrary to popular belief, diet soda and other foods and beverages made with artificial sweeteners like aspartame are not healthy, and they do not bring about weight loss.

A landmark new study out of Texas confirms this, having found that not only do diet sodas not help with weight loss, but they actually cause both weight gain and health problems.

Researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHSC) at San Antonio gathered ten years worth of data on 474 participants from a larger, ongoing study called the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging. Among these participants, those that consumed two or more diet sodas a day experienced waist size increases that were a shocking six times greater than those who did not drink diet soda.

"Data from this and other prospective studies suggest that the promotion of diet sodas and artificial sweeteners as healthy alternatives may be ill-advised," said Helen P. Hazuda, a study researcher and professor at the UTHSC school of medicine. "They may be free of calories, but not of consequences."

Presented at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the findings debunk the false notion that drinking diet beverages is beneficial for weight loss. Since consuming them actually leads to a 70 percent increase in waist size compared to those who do not drink them, it is clear that using the name "diet" is, in and of itself, misleading.

In a related study presented at the same time, researchers also found that aspartame, a commonly-used chemical sweetener in diet foods and beverages, is actually responsible for raising blood sugar levels. In tests using mice, those that consumed chow with added aspartame experienced elevated blood sugar levels compared to mice simply eating regular chow.

"These results suggest that heavy aspartame exposure might potentially directly contribute to increased blood glucose levels, and thus contribute to the associations observed between diet soda consumption and the risk of diabetes in humans," said Gabriel Fernandes, researcher of that study and professor of rheumatology and clinical immunology at UTHSC.

A 2008 study published in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience found similar results when testing the effects of saccharin, another type of artificial sweetener, compared to sugar.

Rats in that study that were fed saccharin gained more weight than rats fed an equivalent amount of plain sugar.

"There's something about diet foods that changes your metabolic limit, your brain chemistry," said Dr. Marie Savard, a medical contributor for ABC News, in response to those findings. "The truth is, we're putting artificial sweetener in so many different things: in water, in yogurt. We have to rethink what this artificial stuff does to us."

A 2010 study conducted by researchers from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases adds to this, having found that the body's reaction to the ingestion of artificial sweeteners appears to be brain confusion over how exactly to process it, which in and of itself is implicated in causing various other negative consequences.

US Food and Drug Administration adverse event reports going back several decades indicate that artificial sweeteners like aspartame are also responsible for destroying brain neurons, which in turn leads to a host of chronic illnesses.

These include, but are not limited to, chronic headaches, seizures, strokes, vascular disorders, heart disease, premature birth, dementia and other brain disorders, and cancer.

So rather than consume artificially-sweetened beverages and foods with the hope that they will somehow induce weight gain and promote health -- two notions that have proven once again to be false -- the best way to begin to lose weight is to consume less processed, refined sugars and simple carbohydrates in the first place.

Instead, develop new eating habits that incorporate clean, whole foods into your diet, and reteach your body how to digest and assimilate nutrients from real food, which is the way it was intended to be.

And remember, not all sugar is necessarily bad for you. The sugar found naturally in fruit, as well as unprocessed sugar from raw sugar cane and coconut sap, for instance, can be beneficial for health.

Coconut sugar, for instance, is very low on the glycemic index, which means that diabetics can safely consume it in moderation, and it is also rich in B vitamins and other nutrients.

Stevia extract, a natural sweetener derived from the leaves of the stevia plant, is another great option. This natural sweetener contains no sugar at all, but is not artificially derived from chemicals as are aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin (http://www.naturalnews.com/stevia.html), so it is a great option for anyone trying to reduce sugar intake, or for diabetics.

Just be sure to buy real stevia extract, not the commercially-sold stevia packets made by Purevia (PepsiCo) and Truvia (Cargill / Coca-Cola), which contain a modified version of their own patented stevia, as well as other additives.

Editor's Note: NaturalNews is strongly against the use of all forms of animal testing. We fully support implementation of humane medical experimentation that promotes the health and well-being of all living creatures.





Source: Dr. Mark Hyman, Youtube, MSNBC, Natural News

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Take The Weight-Loss Challenge





Exercise is only half of true success in weight managment, disease prevention, longevity, good health and happiness. Most people neglect diet, which is the other half of the equation. Healthy eating and proper dietary supplementation are vital to your success in reaching your fitness goals.

Assuming that you're already exercising daily, it may be time to begin taking effective nutrition supplementation. Get your key nutritional balance. Kick-start your road to weight-loss and lean muscle. Support your active lifestyle. Transform your body for optimal weight-loss results. And take your fitness performance to the next level!

Source: Youtube, Visalus

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Monday, September 10, 2012

Friday, August 31, 2012

MEAT The Truth

MEAT THE TRUTH - English spoken from Nicolaas G. Pierson Foundation on Vimeo.

Climate change has made the headlines during the past couple of years. However, there is one major factor which contributes directly to the climate change issue... Be informed and make the best choices to take of yourself as well as your environment!

Source: Meat The Truth Documentary

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Breaking The Food Seduction



Source:  Youtube, Dr. Neal Barnard

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Monday, July 16, 2012

Protect Your Knees!




Doctors have known for many years that having weak
quad muscles (in the front of your upper legs) increases risk for
damage to the cartilage in your knees. A study from Purdue
University shows that strengthening these muscles slows down
knee cartilage damage and may even improve knee function
(Arthritis & Rheumatism, October 2006).

The researchers placed 221 adults in their sixties and
seventies either on a program of strengthening their muscles in
their upper legs or just moving their knees in a series of range-of-
motion exercises. The subjects exercised three times per week
(twice at a fitness facility and once at home) for 12 weeks. This
program was followed by a transition to home-based exercise for
12 months. Older people weaken naturally with aging, but the
range of motion exercisers lost more strength than those who
exercised against progressive resistance. The strength training
helped retain joint space, signifying that this group had less loss of
cartilage.

The knee is like two sticks held together by four bands
called ligaments. Strength training stabilizes the muscles that
support the knee and helps to prevent loss of cartilage with aging.
People with knee pain should get a diagnosis from their doctors.
Most will be advised to do exercises that strengthen the knee,
such as pedaling a bicycle or performing knee strengthening
exercises that involve bending and straightening the knees
against resistance. People with knee pain should avoid exercises
that jar the joints, such as jumping or running.


Source: Dr. Gabe Mirkin 

Thursday, July 5, 2012




Vitamins are essential for the normal growth and development of humans. For the most part, vitamins are obtained from food, but a few are obtained by other means. For example, microorganisms in the intestine – commonly known as “gut flora” – produce vitamin K and biotin, while one form of vitamin D is synthesized in the skin with the help of natural ultraviolet in sunlight. Humans can produce some vitamins from precursors they consume. Examples include vitamin A, produced from beta carotene, and niacin, from the amino acid tryptophan. Throughout life, vitamins are essential for healthy maintenance of the cells, tissues, and organs, and also enable us to efficiently use chemical energy provided by food as well as help process the proteins, carbohydrates, and fats required for respiration.


Deficiencies of vitamins are classified as either primary or secondary. A primary deficiency occurs when we do not get enough of the vitamin in our food. A secondary deficiency may be due to an underlying disorder that prevents or limits the absorption or use of the vitamin, due to a ‘lifestyle factor’, such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, or the use of medications that interfere with the absorption or use of the vitamin. People who eat a varied diet are unlikely to develop a severe primary vitamin deficiency. In contrast, restrictive diets have the potential to cause prolonged vitamin deficits, which may result in often painful and potentially deadly diseases.

Vitamin B1 (thiamin):
Why it’s important: Most cells in the body depend on sugar as an energy source. When oxygen is used to help convert sugar into usable energy, the process of energy generation is called aerobic energy production. This process cannot take place without adequate supplies of vitamin B1. Vitamin B1 also plays a key role in support of the nervous system where it permits healthy development of the fat-like coverings which surround most nerves. A second type of connection between vitamin B1 and the nervous system involves its role in the production of the messaging molecule acetylcholine. This molecule is used by the nervous system to relay messages between the nerves and muscles. Acetylcholine cannot be produced without adequate supplies of vitamin B1. Because acetylcholine is used by the nervous system to ensure proper muscle tone in the heart, deficiency of B1 can also result in compromised heart function. (Vitamin B1 is most famous for its role in the nutritional deficiency disease beriberi.) Note: The leading risk factor for vitamin B1 deficiency in the US is alcoholism. Heavy users of coffee and tea may also have increased risk of B1 deficiency, since these beverages act as diuretics and remove both water and water-soluble vitamins (like B1) from the body. Our need for B1 is also increased by chronic stress, chronic diarrhea, chronic fever, and smoking. Individuals with these health problems may need 5-10 times the ordinary amount of vitamin B1. Medications such as diuretics, birth control pills, antibiotics, and sulfa drugs have all been shown to decrease the availability of vitamin B1 in the body.

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin):
Why it’s important: B2, or riboflavin, acts as a coenzyme to help metabolize carbohydrates, fats and proteins in order to provide the body with energy. It doesn’t act alone, however, it works in concert with its B-complex relatives, particularly B6. B2 has a connection to glutathione, one of the enzymes that rids the body of free radicals. It helps in the regeneration of this beneficial compound. B2 helps to decrease migraines, helps prevent cataracts, and even alleviate sickle-cell disease. Older women who exercise have higher B2 needs than their sedentary counterparts. Note: Large doses of B2 are not toxic.

Vitamin B3 (niacin):
Why it’s important: B3, or niacin, also works to metabolize food and provide energy for the body. Adequate amounts prevent a disease called pellagra, which is characterized by red, rough skin, weakness, loss of appetite, and digestive disturbances. If left untreated, pellagra can be fatal. B3 is very effective at correcting high cholesterol and preventing or reversing heart disease. It can be used to treat insulin-dependent diabetes. It might also be effective in treating arthritis and migraine headaches. Note: Taking niacin supplements (beyond the amount in your daily vitamin) in high doses can be dangerous and should only be taken under the supervision of a health care professional.

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid):
Why it’s important: B5, or pantothenic acid, like the other B vitamins, helps the body extract energy from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. It also helps to metabolize fats and produce red blood cells and hormones from the adrenal gland. B5 might be useful in treating rheumatoid arthritis. It could also be used to lower blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels. B5 is commonly found in “anti-stress” formulas because it works with the adrenal gland to produce stress hormones. Note: There are no known toxicity problems with high doses of B5.

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine):
Why it’s important: B6, or pyridoxine, functions mainly by helping to metabolize protein and amino acids. Because of its work with proteins, it plays a role in the synthesis of protein substances such as muscles, antibodies, and hormones. It also helps out in the production of red blood cells, and neurotransmitters. This vitamin gets together with more than 60 enzymes in the body, working to get many functions accomplished. In addition to building substances in the body, B6 can be effective against diseases such as heart disease, mental depression, kidney stones, MSG sensitivity, PMS, asthma, morning sickness and memory loss. B6 has been used to treat more than 100 health conditions. While B6 is widespread in our daily diet, many people are still not getting enough. One survey showed that B6 intake was below 70% of the RDA in half of the people surveyed. Many foods lose valuable vitamin content during cooking, or when processed, and certain medications increase the need for B6. Note: Supplemental dosage of this vitamin should stay between 50—100 mg per day, divided in several doses to prevent toxicity. Food sources of B6 present no toxicity problems.

Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin):
Why it’s important: B12 is essential to cells because it’s needed to assist folate in making DNA and RNA, which carry and transmit genetic information for every living cell. This information tells a cell how to function and must be passed along each time a cell divides. Rapidly dividing cells need a continuous supply of vitamin B12 and folate. Vitamin B12 plays a central role in folate metabolism. It releases free folate from its bound form so it can be absorbed, and it helps in the transportation and storage of folate. A deficiency of B12 can create a folate deficiency even when dietary intake of folate is adequate. That is why a deficiency of either vitamin causes a similar type of anemia. B12 also functions in the production of a material called myelin, which covers and protects nerve fibers. Without enough B12, nerve transmission suffers and people experience irreversible nerve damage. B12 has health benefits for young and old alike, and everyone in between. It combats asthma in children, has shown promise against HIV in adults, and has helped the elderly who find their minds aren’t as sharp as they used to be, may help alleviate depression and help older adults sleep better. The average American diet supplies plenty of B12, however, strict vegetarians are at risk for deficiency as well as people with pernicious anemia (an inherited disease in which B12 cannot be absorbed). Note: Vitamin B12 is non-toxic.

Every vitamin has an important role to play in our bodies, and they also work with each other to keep us healthy. When we’re deficient in one or more vitamins, it affects every system in the body, directly or indirectly and when deficiency goes on for years, illness and disease results. Achieving better health is as simple as a balanced diet and a daily multivitamin for insurance.


Source: holistichealthlibrary.com

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Serotonin - The Feel Good Chemical

 The feel-good chemical, serotonin, cannot be produced by the body without tryptophan. Without serotonin, people feel low. Ten foods are natural sources of tryptophan. 

 
The body cannot produce tryptophan, an amino acid which is converted by the body into serotonin, so unless we get enough through our diets, we may suffer a deficiency, leading to low serotonin levels.
Low serotonin levels are associated with mood disorders, anxiety, cravings and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
In her e-book The Serotonin Secret, Dr Caroline Longmore says the best way to get optimum tryptophan levels is through a carefully devised eating plan. She rates dozens of foods for their levels of tryptophan.

A French-trained paediatrician who later worked with Medecins Sans Frontieres, travelling to areas in need such as Africa, Cambodia and Vietnam amongst others, Dr Longmore worked for many years in major children’s hospitals in Paris and London.
She has long been interested in nutrition and complementary medicine, and operates a naturopathic and nutrition clinic in Britain.

Food to Improve your Mood

Have a turkey sandwich. Or a handful of sunflower seeds.
These are among the ten best foods for tryptophan listed in The Serotonin Secret.
Written with Australian-trained medical scientist and naturopath Katrin Hempel, the book has 50 recipes designed to solve serotonin imbalance without drugs.
Dr Longmore says the concept works on the same principle as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as popular antidepressant Prozac.
Her top ten good mood foods are mung beans, lobster, turkey, asparagus, sunflower seeds, cottage cheese, pineapple, tofu, spinach and bananas - the foods containing the highest levels of tryptophan.
Britain's Food and Mood Project also recommends eating chicken, sardines, turkey, salmon, fresh tuna, oats, nuts and seeds to boost serotonin levels.

Carbohydrates Help Absorb Tryptohan

The Food and Mood project website explains that including carbohydrates in the diet is important to help absorb tryptophan.
“The absorption of tryptophan into the brain is thought to be greatly enhanced by eating carbohydrate-containing foods and carbohydrate cravings have been explained as a subconscious drive to increase serotonin levels,” it says.
“Carbohydrates that are slow releasing can help the absorption of the tryptophan across the blood-brain barrier without creating a rebound hypoglycaemic dip. Oats are particularly important because they have a low Glycaemic Index.”

Avoid Tryptophan Supplements

Australian mental health experts say the use of tryptophan supplements in Australia has had a chequered history, and should be avoided.
They say that while the theory behind tryptophans for improving mood is solid, its use by depressed patients has not always been successful, and contaminated batches of tryptophan supplements had caused serious side-effects in many patients.
Professor Gordon Parker, of the Black Dog Institute said while some patients strongly believed such supplements were beneficial, scientific evidence was lacking.
"I would say it's something that can be useful for some people but the quality control varies enormously," he said.

Top Ten Good Mood Foods

• mung beans
• lobster
• turkey
• asparagus
• sunflower seeds
• cottage cheese
• pineapple
• tofu
• spinach
• bananas

Other Mood Foods

• chicken
• salmon
• sardines
• tuna
• nuts
• oats

Source: http://suite101.com

Sunday, June 10, 2012

If It's Good Enough For Presidents...




What is a Vegan?

Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, or poultry. Vegans, in addition to being vegetarian, do not use other animal products and by-products such as eggs, dairy products, honey, leather, fur, silk, wool, cosmetics, and soaps derived from animal products.

Why Veganism?

People choose to be vegan for health, environmental, and/or ethical reasons. For example, some vegans feel that one promotes the meat industry by consuming eggs and dairy products. That is, once dairy cows or egg-laying chickens are too old to be productive, they are often sold as meat; and since male calves do not produce milk, they usually are raised for veal or other products. Some people avoid these items because of conditions associated with their production.
Many vegans choose this lifestyle to promote a more humane and caring world. They know they are not perfect, but believe they have a responsibility to try to do their best, while not being judgmental of others.

 

Vegan Nutrition

The key to a nutritionally sound vegan diet is variety. A healthy and varied vegan diet includes fruits, vegetables, plenty of leafy greens, whole grain products, nuts, seeds, and legumes.

 

Protein

It is very easy for a vegan diet to meet the recommendations for protein as long as calorie intake is adequate. Strict protein planning or combining is not necessary. The key is to eat a varied diet.
Almost all foods except for alcohol, sugar, and fats provide some protein. Vegan sources include: lentils, chickpeas, tofu, peas, peanut butter, soy milk, almonds, spinach, rice, whole wheat bread, potatoes, broccoli, kale...

 

Fat

Vegan diets are free of cholesterol and are generally low in saturated fat. Thus eating a vegan diet makes it easy to conform to recommendations given to reduce the risk of major chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. High-fat foods, which should be used sparingly, include oils, margarine, nuts, nut butters, seed butters, avocado, and coconut.

 

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is not found in the vegan diet but can be made by humans following exposure to sunlight. At least ten to fifteen minutes of summer sun on hands and face two to three times a week is recommended for adults so that vitamin D production can occur. Food sources of vitamin D include vitamin D-fortified orange juice and vitamin D-fortified soy milk and rice milk.

 

Calcium

Calcium, needed for strong bones, is found in dark green vegetables, tofu made with calcium sulfate, calcium-fortified soy milk and orange juice, and many other foods commonly eaten by vegans. Although lower animal protein intake may reduce calcium losses, there is currently not enough evidence to suggest that vegans have lower calcium needs. Vegans should eat foods that are high in calcium and/or use a calcium supplement.

 

CALCIUM CONTENT OF SELECTED FOODS

Following are some good sources of calcium:
   ___________________________________________________________

   Soy or rice milk,
 commercial, calcium-
 fortified, plain     8 oz      200-300 mg

   Collard greens, cooked                  1 cup     357 mg

   Blackstrap molasses                     2 TB      400 mg

   Tofu, processed with 
        calcium sulfate                    4 oz      200-330 mg

   Calcium-fortified
 orange juice      8 oz      300 mg

   Tofu, processed with 
        nigari                     4 oz      80-230 mg

   Kale, cooked       1 cup     179 mg

   Tahini       2 TB      128 mg

   Almonds                                 1/4 cup   89 mg
   ___________________________________________________________

Other good sources of calcium include: okra, turnip greens, soybeans, tempeh, almond butter, broccoli, bok choy, commercial soy yogurt...
The recommended intake for calcium for adults 19 through 50 years is 1000 milligrams/day.
Note: It appears that oxalic acid, which is found in spinach, rhubarb, chard, and beet greens, binds with calcium and reduces calcium absorption. Calcium is well absorbed from other dark green vegetables.

 

Zinc

Vegan diets can provide zinc at levels close to or even higher than the RDA. Zinc is found in grains, legumes, and nuts.

 

Iron

Dried beans and dark green leafy vegetables are especially good sources of iron, better on a per calorie basis than meat. Iron absorption is increased markedly by eating foods containing vitamin C along with foods containing iron.

 

Sources of Iron

Soybeans, lentils, blackstrap molasses, kidney beans, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, Swiss chard, tempeh, black beans, prune juice, beet greens, tahini, peas, bulghur, bok choy, raisins, watermelon, millet, kale....

 

Comparison of Iron Sources

Here are the iron contents of selected foods:
       ______________________________________________

            FOOD                            IRON (MG)
       ______________________________________________

       1 cup cooked soybeans                   8.8
       2 Tbsp blackstrap molasses              7.0
       1 cup cooked lentils                    6.6  
       1 cup cooked kidney beans               5.2
       1 cup cooked chickpeas                  4.7
       1 cup cooked lima beans                 4.5
       1 cup cooked Swiss chard                4.0
       1/8 medium watermelon                   1.0
       ______________________________________________

 

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

In order to maximize production of DHA and EPA (omega-3 fatty acids), vegans should include good sources of alpha-linolenic acid in their diets such as flaxseed, flaxseed oil, canola oil, tofu, soybeans, and walnuts.

 

Vitamin B12

The requirement for vitamin B12 is very low. Non-animal sources include Red Star nutritional yeast T6635 also known as Vegetarian Support Formula (around 2 teaspoons supplies the adult RDA). It is especially important for pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children to have reliable sources of vitamin B12 in their diets. Numerous foods are fortified with B12, but sometimes companies change what they do. So always read labels carefully or write the companies.
Tempeh, miso, and seaweed are often labeled as having large amounts of vitamin B12. However, these products are not reliable sources of the vitamin because the amount of vitamin B12 present depends on the type of processing the food undergoes. Other sources of vitamin B12 are fortified soy milk (check the label as this is rarely available in the U.S.), vitamin B12-fortified meat analogues, and vitamin B12 supplements. There are supplements which do not contain animal products. Vegetarians who are not vegan can also obtain vitamin B12 from dairy products and eggs.

 

Common Vegan Foods

Oatmeal, stir-fried vegetables, cereal, toast, orange juice, peanut butter on whole wheat bread, frozen fruit desserts, lentil soup, salad bar items like chickpeas and three bean salad, dates, apples, macaroni, fruit smoothies, popcorn, spaghetti, vegetarian baked beans, guacamole, chili...

 

Vegans Also Eat...

Tofu lasagna, homemade pancakes without eggs, hummus, eggless cookies, soy ice cream, tempeh, corn chowder, soy yogurt, rice pudding, fava beans, banana muffins, spinach pies, oat nut burgers, falafel, corn fritters, French toast made with soy milk, soy hot dogs, vegetable burgers, pumpkin casserole, scrambled tofu, seitan.

 

When Eating Out Try These Foods

Pizza without cheese, Chinese moo shu vegetables, Indian curries and dahl, eggplant dishes without the cheese, bean tacos without the lard and cheese (available from Taco Bell and other Mexican restaurants), Middle Eastern hummus and tabouli, Ethiopian injera (flat bread) and lentil stew, Thai vegetable curries...

 

Egg and Dairy Replacers

As a binder, substitute for each egg:
  • 1/4 cup (2 ounces) soft tofu blended with the liquid ingredients of the recipe, or
  • 1 small banana, mashed, or
  • 1/4 cup applesauce, or
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch or arrowroot starch, or Ener-G Egg Replacer or another commercial mix found in health food stores.
The following substitutions can be made for dairy products:
  • Soy milk, rice milk, potato milk, nut milk, or water (in some recipes) may be used.
  • Buttermilk can be replaced with soured soy or rice milk. For each Cup of buttermilk, use 1 cup soymilk plus 1 tablespoon of vinegar.
  • Soy cheese available in health food stores. (Be aware that many soy cheeses contain casein, which is a dairy product.)
  • Crumbled tofu can be substituted for cottage cheese or ricotta cheese in lasagna and similar dishes.
  • Several brands of nondairy cream cheese are available in some supermarkets and kosher stores.

Source: CNN, vrg.org